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Environmental Effects on Mitosis—Blended Inquiry Lab Solution for AP® Biology, 1-Year Access

By: The Flinn Staff

In the Environmental Effects on Mitosis Inquiry Lab Solution for AP® Biology, students study the effects of biotic and abiotic factors on mitosis in onion root tips and then they form, test and justify a hypothesis.

Includes access to exclusive FlinnPREP™ digital content to combine the benefits of classroom, laboratory and digital learning. Each blended learning lab solution includes prelab videos about concepts, techniques and procedures, summary videos that relate the experiment to the AP® exam, and standards-based, tested inquiry labs with real sample data. FlinnPREP™ Inquiry Lab Solutions are adaptable to you and how you teach with multiple ways to access and run your AP® labs.

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Big Idea 3, Investigation 7, Science Practices 1, 5, 6, 7

Do different growing environments affect cell division in plants? Study the effects of biotic and abiotic factors on mitosis in onion root tips with this Inquiry Lab Kit. The lab begins with a Baseline Activity studying cell division in two groups of onion root tips. First, students treat the root tips and create microscope slides to observe cell division. Then they perform a statistical analysis of percent mitosis in treated root tips versus a control group. This Baseline Activity provides a model for the Opportunities for Inquiry portion of the lab when students are tasked to develop a testable hypothesis and design an experiment that they can plan, discuss, evaluate, execute and finally justify to their peers. Students are provided with guiding questions like, “In areas where there are very few plants growing, what biotic and abiotic factors may be affecting the rate of mitosis and the ability of plants to thrive?” and “What chemicals may be expected to increase or decrease the rate of mitosis in plants?” to help inspire the inquiry experiment.

Includes detailed teacher notes, reproducible student handouts and enough materials for eight groups of students to complete the Baseline Activity and to prepare for the inquiry activity. Compound microscopes and onion root tips are required and available separately.

Red kidney bean lectin (Phytohemagglutinin) is used in the College Board lab. Lectin is a lyophilized powder that must be kept refrigerated. The recommended concentration is 10 mg in 200 mL of deionized water. Once diluted, it must be stored in the refrigerator and is only active for a few days. Lectin increases mitosis in the roots, but is also hemolytic and must be used with appropriate personal protective equipment.

Correlation to Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

Science & Engineering Practices

Asking questions and defining problems
Developing and using models
Planning and carrying out investigations
Analyzing and interpreting data
Using mathematics and computational thinking
Constructing explanations and designing solutions
Engaging in argument from evidence

Disciplinary Core Ideas

HS-LS1.B: Growth and Development of Organisms
HS-LS1.A: Structure and Function
HS-LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems
HS-LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience

Crosscutting Concepts

Scale, proportion, and quantity
Cause and effect
Systems and system models
Energy and matter
Structure and function
Stability and change

Performance Expectations

HS-LS1-1. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins, which carry out the essential functions of life through systems of specialized cells.
HS-LS1-2. Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.
HS-LS1-3. Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.
HS-LS1-4. Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms.
HS-LS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.
HS-LS2-6. Evaluate claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.